Before the Parthenon, ‘The Architecture of the Archaic Athenian Acropolis’

Monday, February 24, 7:30 PM
Room 15
Richards Hall
Stadium Drive and T Street, Lincoln, NE

The Lincoln-Omaha Society of the Archaeological Institute of America announces the fourth lecture on archaeology for the 2013 – 2014 season. Nancy Klein, a classical archaeologist from Texas A&M University, will present a public lecture on what the Athenian Acropolis was like before the Parthenon was constructed in the 440s BC.

Contact:
Prof. Michael Hoff
Professor of Art History
University of Nebraska–Lincoln
472-5342

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American Gatha: Ritual Music in US Shin Buddhist Communities

Tues., March 18, 2014
4:00 to 5:30 p.m.
Ubuntu Room/202
Jackie Gaughan Multicultural Center

At once a perpetuation of Japanese Buddhist custom and a marker of acculturation, Jodo Shinshu songs (gatha) are uniquely adapted to Buddhist practice, reflecting the broad range of influences and inspirations that make up the Shin community–one of the largest Buddhist groups in North America. This presentation will explore how these songs function in a ritual context and how a study of its music can alter our understanding of Buddhism in America.

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Professor Lahey on ‘Death Cafe’ in Lincoln Journal Star

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December 9, 2013 · 7:32 am

Justification by Works in Reformation Theology

Anthony N. S. Lane, Professor of Historical Theology, London School of Theology
Date: April 8, 2013
Time: 5:oo pm
Location: Dudley Bailey Library, 228 Andrews Hall, City Campus
Refreshments will be served, open to the public.
Co-sponsored by the department of Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program.

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The Eastern Transmission: History or Myth?

Presented by Prof. Paul Groner, University of Virginia, Religious Studies. Both traditional and modern histories of Buddhism often stress the unbroken transmission of Buddhism in an Eastward direction: India –> China–> Korea and Japan –> America and Europe. Historians stressed the orthodox qualities of the transmission, particularly the transmission of ordinations as full-fledged monks (and sometimes nuns), the purity of practice, and the connection with the historical Buddha. However, such an emphasis does not allow for the dramatic changes that occurred as Buddhism entered new cultures. In this talk, I look at three elements of this story in order to examine the strengths and weaknesses of ideal of an eastward transmission: the transmission of Buddhism to China; the development of new forms of ordination and monastic discipline in Japan; and finally development of Buddhism in America. Thursday, February 28, 2013, 4:30 to 6:00 p.m., Jackie Gaughan Multiculure Center, 15th & ‘S’ Street, Lincoln, NE. Open to the public.

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“Ancient Greeks/Modern Lives”

What can ancient Greeks teach modern day veterans about the return home and the many challenges they will face? Dr. Christine Emler, Associate Chief of Medicine of the Veterans Administration, Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System and Dr. Anne Duncan, Associate Professor of Classics and Religious Studies, UNL, will host professional actors from Aquila Theatre of New York City on October 17 for two events: a performance workshop at 5 p.m., exploring the difficulties and benefits of performing ancient Greek plays to a 21st century audience and a reading of selected scenes from Greek tragedies at 7 p.m. Both events are free and open to the public. Location: Lincoln’s VA facility, auditorium, 600 S. 70th Street. In addition, Dr. Duncan will have a follow-up lecture open to the public on October 22 in the VA auditorium (600 S. 70th, Lincoln) on combat trauma in Homer’s “Iliad.”

Click here to listen to Prof. Duncan’s lecture

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Interfaith lecture: “One God, One Message”

Guest Presenter: Sheikh Yusuf Estes
Topic: Lecture on the Unique Divinity of God, entitled “One God, One Message.”
Date: June 7th from 7:00-9:00pm
Place: Room 117, Bessey Hall

A renowned American Muslim convert, Yusuf Estes endeavors to build bridges between the various faiths of the world through a message of peace. He is often featured as guest presenter and keynote speaker at various Islamic events as well as frequently appearing on various Islamic satellites TV channels. In September 2000, he was a Muslim Delegate to the United Nations World Peace Conference for Religious Leaders held at the U.N.

Event sponsored by the UNL Muslim Students Association and the Department of Classics and Religious Studies.

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